Simple and difficult

Listening, doing your best work, cultivating an open mind and heart, seeking inner truth, being there for your loved ones—the important things in life are simple and difficult.

Complement with how to create meaning instead of trying to find itthis radio interview about creativity, and do what matters.

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Interview with Indie Digital Media

I talked to Richard MacManus at Indie Digital Media about lessons I've learned writing and publishing novels:

https://indiedigitalmedia.com/2019/02/05/interview-with-author-eliot-peper/

"Books (and other creative products) succeed when readers tell other readers about them. That means that the most important thing I can do when I launch a new thing is get it into the hands of people who will love it so very much that they won’t be able to keep their enthusiasm to themselves, and then trust them to share it with the world."

"I shared work I was proud of with people I cared about, people whose work I respected and championed, people who had real, personal, specific reasons for wanting to take a chance on my novels. Over time, that group of people grew. In short, I kept writing and built direct relationships with a small but growing community of readers."

"We can’t control popularity, but we can control inputs. Doing your best work and putting it out there exposes you to serendipity. Focus on that, and sooner or later the rest will take care of itself."

Complement with three pieces of advice for building a writing career, how to build an organic fanbase, and my Indie Hackers interview.

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Special Event: The Art of Fiction and Memoir

Bay Area people, mark your calendars! Eva Hagberg Fisher and I are hosting a very special joint book launch party and it's going to be, ahem, AWESOME.

We will be interviewing each other about our respective books (How To Be Loved and Borderless) and the art of writing fiction and memoir. Eva's flying out all the way from NYC and this will be the only Bay Area event I do this year, so we are going to go deep, dig into craft, and ensure you seriously don't want to miss it.

The estimable Novel Brewing Company is hosting and will have a bunch of special beers on tap. Oh, and we'll be supplying mouthwatering Cheeseboard pizza to those who show up on time.

When: 7PM on February 7th
Where: Novel Brewing Company, 6510 San Pablo Ave., Oakland
Bring: Friends, appetite, curiosity
Do: RSVP ASAP so we know how much pizza to order

For the uninitiated, Borderless is a lush, philosophical, near-future novel extrapolating the rise of tech platforms and the decline of the nation state and How To Be Loved is a raw, moving memoir about illness, friendship, and figuring out what love really means. Eva is an incredibly talented writer and I would follow her voice to the ends of the Earth. Seriously, read it (and you'll probably weep). Both books have earned critical acclaim and we can't wait to delve into the creative process behind them.

Come eat, drink, ask us hard questions, and blow your literary minds!

Complement with the East Bay Express on Borderless, three pieces of advice for building a writing career, and my Google Talk about Cumulus.

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Look to the liminal

Barely plausible niche ideas. The outskirts and underpasses of a megalopolis. Burgeoning self awareness. The cultural fringe. Technologies that appear to be nothing more than toys. The fractal outline of a fern frond. Marginal returns. Emotions that are just barely ineffable. Border towns. The moment just before you lean in for a first kiss. Coastal ecosystems. Flirting with irony. The lucid dreamscape halfway between sleep and wakefulness.

The ragged edges of things are always the most interesting part.

Complement with how the creative process reflects our evolving selves, why isolation can hinder creativity, and how reading science fiction can make your thinking more flexible.

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Kim Stanley Robinson on the crisis of representation, the future of geopolitics, and the power of science fiction

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The creative process is a mirror that reflects our evolving selves

Song Exploder deconstructs every element of individual songs to the most granular level of detail. Chef's Table takes viewers into the kitchen to observe world renowned chefs at work. A cottage industry serves tourists who visit the abandoned Tunisian movie sets where George Lucas filmed the Tatooine scenes of the first Star Wars movie in 1976.

Bearing witness to the creative process is endlessly fascinating because it reflects the unceasing process of becoming that we call "life." In watching art take form, we glimpse our evolving selves.

Complement with this sneak peek into the creative process behind my latest novel, what my secret agent grandmother taught me about the power of narrative, and a brief anatomy of story.

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Three Amazing Sci-Fi Writers Talk About the Future — of Tech, Politics, Privacy, Climate, and More

"What do citizenship and borders mean — what should they mean — in a globally networked world? How can we protect the legitimacy of our political institutions in the face of rampant digital disinformation and manipulation? Is global corporate power threatening national sovereignty, and is that a good or a bad thing? If the modern system of nation-states that has lasted for nearly half a millennium becomes a thing of the past, what system will replace it?"

These are a few of the questions that Kevin Bankston posed to Malka Older, Ada Palmer, and myself in a recent two-hour long interview. Bankston is the director of the Open Technology Institute, maintains an excellent science fiction newsletter, and has written about the feedback loop between science fiction and reality for publications like the Atlantic and Slate. Palmer and Older are two of my very favorite authors and I've previously recommended both of their books in my reading recommendation newsletter.

Needless to say, this conversation was a lot of fun and I think you'll get a kick out of it. You can read the transcript or watch the full video here:

https://medium.com/@KevinBankston/three-amazing-sci-fi-writers-talk-about-the-future-of-tech-politics-privacy-climate-and-more-60295e39028f

Complement with this Medium feature on Bandwidth, this podcast interview about writing science fiction, and Malka Older on the future of democracy.

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